Nunc Cognosco Ex Parte 5

Here is my fifth post of links to what I’ve found intriguing, compelling or convicting lately.  Perhaps you’ll find something of interest in what I’ve been reading online and in print!

IMAG2705We have plenty of family photographs from days long past with rows and rows of large families assembled in front of a farm-house, dressed in somber black with nary a smile.  And then, there is the Daughter’s gallery of Grumpy Italian Men from the National Gallery of Art.  It is nice to know that we aren’t the only ones asking Why Didn’t People Smile in Old Portraits?  Thanks to History Myths Debunked!

I love Children’s Books, especially those with lush, colorful illustrations.  This collection of The 20 Most Beautiful Children’s Books of All Time made me smile!

Though my university years are long gone, the coursework required by my degree in Communication Arts covered Journalism, Public Relations and Development (fundraising for Non-Profits) and the business, law and ethics involved in each.  The years of self-righteous post-Watergate Boys on the Bus “the public has a right to know” posturing has disintegrated into obsequious post-Obama cocktail-parties-on-Air-Force-One cover-ups that should turn anyone that claims to be a journalist red from shame, or yellow from cowardice, or perhaps shades of both.  I found this stringent article in the UK  Guardian’s Media Blog about Seymour Hersh refreshingly direct and specific, but Hersh still slips and slides around the somewhat obvious and unvarnished truth.

I was glad that The Christians picked up and republished this opinion piece by Jonathan Jacobs, director of the Institute for Criminal Justice Ethics, and chair of Department of Philosophy at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in NY.   Entitled “As Education Declines, So Does Civic Culture,” it addresses the inability of our younger citizens to think.  Actually, if you read the comments in almost any article online you’ll realize civic culture has declined in all age groups in our nation.

director of the Institute for Criminal Justice Ethics, and chairman of the Department of Philosophy at John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. – See more at: http://thechristians.com/?q=node/644&utm_source=theChristians.com+Subscribers&utm_campaign=4c88d4718f-TCH-Issue0116-WS&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ce469a7d32-4c88d4718f-61075205#sthash.ksnniFNy.dpuf

Whatever your stance regarding the “culture wars” and the politics of higher education, it is undeniable that a great many graduating students have little idea of what genuine intellectual exploration involves. Too often, learning to think is replaced by ideological scorekeeping, and the use of adjectives replaces the use of arguments.

Such blinkered thinking has serious implications for civic culture and political discourse. It discourages finding out what the facts are, revising one’s beliefs on the basis of those facts, and being willing to engage with people who don’t already agree with you. What does that leave us with? A brittle, litmus-test version of politics. It is one thing if people move too quickly from argumentation to name-calling; it is another to be unable to tell the difference.

– See more at: http://thechristians.com/?q=node/644&utm_source=theChristians.com+Subscribers&utm_campaign=4c88d4718f-TCH-Issue0116-WS&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ce469a7d32-4c88d4718f-61075205#sthash.ksnniFNy.dpuf

Too often, learning to think is replaced by ideological scorekeeping, and the use of adjectives replaces the use of arguments.

Such blinkered thinking has serious implications for civic culture and political discourse. It discourages finding out what the facts are, revising one’s beliefs on the basis of those facts, and being willing to engage with people who don’t already agree with you.

Whatever your stance regarding the “culture wars” and the politics of higher education, it is undeniable that a great many graduating students have little idea of what genuine intellectual exploration involves. Too often, learning to think is replaced by ideological scorekeeping, and the use of adjectives replaces the use of arguments.

Such blinkered thinking has serious implications for civic culture and political discourse. It discourages finding out what the facts are, revising one’s beliefs on the basis of those facts, and being willing to engage with people who don’t already agree with you. What does that leave us with? A brittle, litmus-test version of politics. It is one thing if people move too quickly from argumentation to name-calling; it is another to be unable to tell the difference.

– See more at: http://thechristians.com/?q=node/644&utm_source=theChristians.com+Subscribers&utm_campaign=4c88d4718f-TCH-Issue0116-WS&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ce469a7d32-4c88d4718f-61075205#sthash.ksnniFNy.dpuf

Whatever your stance regarding the “culture wars” and the politics of higher education, it is undeniable that a great many graduating students have little idea of what genuine intellectual exploration involves. Too often, learning to think is replaced by ideological scorekeeping, and the use of adjectives replaces the use of arguments.

Such blinkered thinking has serious implications for civic culture and political discourse. It discourages finding out what the facts are, revising one’s beliefs on the basis of those facts, and being willing to engage with people who don’t already agree with you. What does that leave us with? A brittle, litmus-test version of politics. It is one thing if people move too quickly from argumentation to name-calling; it is another to be unable to tell the difference.

– See more at: http://thechristians.com/?q=node/644&utm_source=theChristians.com+Subscribers&utm_campaign=4c88d4718f-TCH-Issue0116-WS&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ce469a7d32-4c88d4718f-61075205#sthash.ksnniFNy.dpuf

Along similar lines, if you chuckled about Pop Science turning off their comments, you’ll appreciate this post Crying Wolf Over a Puppy-Dog.  Of course if you read the comments, you’ll see Mr. Jacob’s point proved many times over.

Among other things, the POTUS attempted to shut down key Washington DC destinations, some of which are privately funded, which proved awkward for the administration.  In any case, who didn’t find it inspiring to see that the “Greatest Generation” has not changed one bit?

I frequently find myself cheering when I read The Matt Walsh Blog.  Here is an interesting post:  Seven Persuasive Pro-Choice Arguments from a Rational Thoughtful Progressive.

Kirsten Powers was one of the few in the old media willing to point out media blackout on the uncomfortably horrific Kermit Gosnell trial.  In A Global Slaughter of Christians, but America’s Churches Stay Silent, she points out the utter lack of courage on the part of American pastors to speak up for these fellow brothers and sisters in Christ.  Perhaps unlike Paul, John and Peter, pastors today think talking about persecution isn’t good for business.  The church we have been visiting is one of the silent ones, to our great disappointment.

Mr. Garner and I loved this video put together by Number 1 Son’s teammates!  Frisbee is no longer a gentle toss on the college green with your bandanna clad dog! 

Poetry nourishes the soul and the intellect, so I leave you with a handy collection of Autumn Poems from About.com.  And a link to my Autumnal Equinox Playlist on Spotify…

Happy Autumn!

The post title I’ve chosen for these sorts of posts is obscure on purpose.  Meaning “now I know in part,” the phrase is found in Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians towards the end of chapter 13.  It refers to the fact that our knowledge of God and His mysteries unfolds only in part during our human existence.  We must wait for full disclosure.  This should instill a great deal of humility in our thinking…

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